Articles

One Nation - Disraeli never said it

For years Alistair Lexden, the Conservative Party’s official historian, has been correcting the mistake that is constantly being made in attributing the famous phrase “One Nation” to Disraeli. It appeared again in The Times on 3 December.

Hero in war, hopeless in politics

A report in The Daily Telegraph on November 29 about a famous First World War painting prompted the following letter from Alistair Lexden, which was published on December 3 in the centre of the page with a picture of the painting in question.

 

School bullies

This was the headline over a leading article in The Times on November 17, stemming from a report in the paper that “local councils have been blocking special needs children from the basic assistance to which they are entitled”, spending £100 million in the process.

Publish those letters

In a letter published in The Times on November 19, Alistair Lexden called for an end to the secrecy surrounding the process by which a vote of no confidence can be sought in the leader of the Conservative Party.

An unhappy admiral

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph at the beginning of November, Alistair Lexden revealed a hitherto little-known account of how the Armistice at the end of the First World War came to be brought into force at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

Baldwin's election

It was under this headline that a letter from Alistair Lexden was published in the TLS: The Times Literary Supplement on November 9.

The new political world created in 1918

Alistair Lexden was asked to write an article about the political aftermath of the First World War for Parliament’s House Magazine. The text of his article, which was published on 12 November, follows.

A better class of insult

In his Times column on October 24, Matthew Parris praised Disraeli’s repertoire of insults under the headline: “Our verbally abusive MPs have nothing on Disraeli”.

A stylish survey of all our prime ministers

At the start of his career as a journalist in the mid-1980s, Andrew Gimson regretted the absence of a book that enabled the reader to gain a clear impression quickly of all Britain’s prime ministers. He has now written such a book. Alistair Lexden’s review of it follows.