News

Human Rights in the Commonwealth

On March 22, the Lords debated the government’s plans for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting to be held in London in April.

Free school meals

Controversy has arisen over the impact of the new streamlined welfare payment, universal credit, on the provision of free school meals. Critics say that the number of children in poor families getting a good free meal at school will drop sharply.

Chamberlain and Churchill - a perfect partnership

Patrick Donner, a Second World War RAF pilot and Tory MP, wrote in his memoirs: “must not the final verdict be that Neville Chamberlain and Winston Churchill between them saved this country?  Neither statesman would have achieved our salvation without the other”.

Bringing state and independent schools together

Contrary to widespread belief, independent schools have never disdained contact with their counterparts in the state sector. There has never been a “Berlin Wall” between them, as some politicians have alleged.

Attempted political theft

On March 7, The Times reported that Henry Bolton, recently ousted as UKIP’s leader, has launched his own political party called One Nation.

Did Churchill drink too much?

Many people have said that he did. In a recent interview, reported in The Daily Telegraph on 2 March, his 97-year-old niece, Lady Avon (widow of Anthony Eden), denied that his consumption was out of the ordinary.

Continuing deadlock in Northern Ireland

Another round of talks about the resumption of devolved government in Northern Ireland collapsed on 14 February.

A few days later a document, setting out the terms of a possible agreement, was leaked to a Northern Ireland journalist.

Votes at 16 - and all other rights too?

According to an article in the London Evening Standard on 15 February, support for lowering the voting age to 16 is growing among Conservative MPs, though the government has ruled out any change.

The true heroine of the women's suffrage campaign

The centenary of the 1918 Representation of the People Act, which extended the right to vote in parliamentary elections to a limited number of women, has given Alistair Lexden several opportunities to draw attention to the most important person in the long campaign for women’s suffrage, Dame Mill